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New Paisley artwork to welcome arrivals at Paisley Gilmour Street Station

Paisley’s vibrant art scene will shortly welcome a new arrival to the town with a new arts project about to get underway inside the town’s main train station.

Paisley First, with the support of the Scotrail Alliance, has commissioned local artist Caroline Gormley to produce the first artwork for the walls on the corridors to Platforms 1 to 4 in Paisley Gilmour Street Railway Station.

New Paisley artwork to welcome arrivals at Paisley Gilmour Street Station

Paisley First was inundated with entries for the walls but Caroline’s winning design emerged as a clear favourite among Gilmour Street station staff.

Paisley First Chairman Ian Henderson said: “More than four million passengers pass through Gilmour Street, the town’s largest railway station, every year.”

“Caroline is a well-known local artist who most recently completed the fantastic Buddie mural for the Paisley First Wall Series on Storie Street.”

“We can’t wait to see her finished design which will provide a warm Paisley welcome for people using the station from near and far.”

The project is on track thanks to the support of station managers, the ScotRail Alliance.

Heather Collins, the ScotRail Alliance’s Station Manager for Paisley, said: “We want our stations to be vibrant and welcoming and Caroline’s artwork is going to enhance the walls in Gilmour Street so much.”

“Rail travellers will get a flavour of the heritage of Paisley and its importance to residents in the town.”

“We’re all looking forward to seeing it completed.”

Artist Caroline Gormley, who will work with co-artist Sandy Guy on the wall, said: “First port of call is getting on the train that brings you to Gilmour Street station, the gateway to Paisley and its vibrant culture, which will definitely give you something to write home about.”

“It’s a celebration of Paisley people, their vision, enthusiasm, positivity, determination, humour and hard work.”

“Paisley wouldn’t have heritage if it wasn’t for the people of the town, this has been the case throughout our history and it continues today. The use of the postcard was to add an element of humour, also the postcard may be seen as a thing of the past when it comes to communication but people have to look to their past in order to create a better, brighter future.”

“Today now is tomorrow’s history.”

Work is expected to begin at the wall inside the station next week with no disruption to commuters.